Here are the facts behind 5 Arizona bark scorpion myths

When the temperature rises, it’s time to look out for the Arizona bark scorpion. This species is the most common scorpion found in Phoenix-area homes and packs a painful sting. However, many of the so-called facts about this creature are actually misinformation. Here’s the truth you need to know behind five common Arizona bark scorpion myths.

For a free scorpion inspection here in Phoenix, contact our team today! To learn more about scorpions, be sure to check out our blog post, 5 Facts About Bark Scorpions.

5 common Arizona Bark Scorpion myths:

Scorpion Treatment Phoenix1. You’ll see a mark if a scorpion stings

You might not know that you’ve been stung by a scorpion if you don’t see the creature. Their barbs rarely leave marks and typically don’t cause swelling. When infants and young children are stung, parents often can’t understand why they are in pain.

2. Scorpions lay eggs

Actually, scorpions give birth to live babies. They typically have 25 to 35 offspring at one time, which is why one adage is actually true: if you see one scorpion, you likely have more in your home. Scorpions give birth in the summer and the young grow to their first molt within one to three weeks. Mothers carry their infants on their backs.

3. Scorpions only come out at night

While it’s true the Arizona bark scorpion is nocturnal, that doesn’t mean you won’t encounter one during the day. They tend to stay in dark, tight spaces, so use caution in your attic, closets, and basement. Outdoors, they hide in leaf piles, under rocks, and in stacks of wood when the sun is out.

4. The larger the scorpion, the more serious the sting

This is one of the most pervasive Arizona bark scorpion myths. Although it’s one of the smaller scorpion species at just 2 to 3 inches long, it’s the only one in the U.S. that can cause human fatalities.

However, most bark scorpion stings are not life-threatening. That’s because scorpions can control the amount of venom they inject. Actually, baby scorpion stings tend to be more dangerous because they haven’t developed this control yet.

5. Scorpions are aggressive

Although they have a nasty reputation, scorpions are prefer to avoid human contact. Most scorpion stings occur when accidental contact is made by a human (you) onto a scorpion. For instance, stepping on a scorpion on the floor, brushing up against one on the wall, or reaching under something and accidentally touching one.

You can see how—if you have an infestation in the home—your chances of a scorpion sting increase. However, it’s certainly an Arizona bark scorpion myth that these pests are “out to get you.”

Call KY-KO for a scorpion inspection!

KY-KO Pest Prevention offers free scorpion inspections to homeowners in the Phoenix metro area. Our experienced technicians can determine whether your home has an issue and take safe steps to remove the scorpion population. We’ll also help dispel any other Arizona bark scorpion myths by answering your questions and providing you with questions.